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November 17, 2011

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Epredator

A very interesting post. I was initially shocked at the thought of your mum putting her foot through the TV. Your observation with your kids is one that I also see with mine. Many of the pieces of technology magic that I think are special, because I remember seeing them evolve are less special to them. Yes they like playing games, watching TV, but they will also stop mid game put down the DS and go and do something else, or swap DS's mid game.
As for creating, they have more tools to create, and we can create together. Whenever my youngest sees the universal ident on a movie he mentions the Predlets movie trailer we made where i had them running around in the garden and then edited it up on imovie with the trailer wizard. (It starts with a very similar ident to universal).
It is very noticeable that maker culture holds the most interesting future. Now that people can truly share ideas and designs online it gives the opportunity to use the tech not just to spoon feed information but to share ideas. The starting point for that is sharing of ourselves and what we do. People have the opportunity to learn and explore in ways they have never had before. That does not mean they have all learned how to learn so we have to help them.
I now do a tech slot in a kids TV show here in the UK. My aim to get kids into Science and Tech. It is so noticeable that many of the things I bring to the show are easy to look up or get set up in schools to explore further. The thrill of being able to make their own toys, gadgets and gizmos and explore creativity through science seems a very positive undertone with our audience.
So I have great hope(as you finished on) that the inquisitive explorers out there will all grab hold of the mass of information and data and start to build upon in. As usual the vast proportion of the population will not be bothered to start with, but their lives will be enriched by the few.

Mary Connors

Just returned from the Desert glitz and caught up with you're latest blog, right on in every way. Thank you for giving my grandchildren the opportunity to express themselves creatively. We were so impressed when we witnessed the early morning exercises ( drawing and writing)

GG

Patrick

Ah yes. Neil Postman's book had an impact on my thinking, if not my TV viewing habits, when I discovered it.

I am also reminded of McLuhan: the medium is the message.

Which helps me conceptually relate Postman's thesis with where I find myself today.

I live in a society bred on passive consumption of predigested "information" (aka entertainment). This information product flooded the "market" with channel after channel of goods. A new asynchronous digital distribution channel delivered a whole new source of "information" on-demand. And with it come two new demand-generation mechanisms that tap deep into the human motivation system: inclusion and scarcity.

Now everyone can be involved in the "creation" of information, and the frequency of change is becoming so fast that the hunt for the scarce—the new and unknown—drives the consumption habits: always on, always connected, always monitoring....what? Possibly the greatest example of poor signal to noise ratio ever concocted?

Makes me think of some other McLuhanisms:
-Today the business of business is becoming the constant invention of new business.
-When a thing is current, it creates currency.
-The ignorance of how to use new knowledge stockpiles exponentially.
(Full disclosure: I found these with Google)

How do we equip our generation and future generations to understand, appreciate, and critically analyze information in a way that is rewarding and beneficial to the individual and to society?

How do we escape the game of information commoditization that elevates the monetization of "inclusion and scarcity" over the value of signal strength?

Are our children inherently inquisitive enough to find the real world that lurks beyond the information packages we create? Which one will they prefer to live in?

charmingdate.com

Nice to be here and see your post!

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